If you had to describe the style of your films in a sentence, what would you say?
They’re badass. There’s a distinct visual aesthetic and a narrative flow that can be either loose or cohesive, depending on the project. Whichever way it goes, the aim is to leave people wanting more.

Have you always wanted to create films?
I’ve always been drawn to them. I’ve taken something from them, studied them in my own way. I’ve worked on some, but I wasn’t a fan of that at all. It felt authentic to go out and create them, so that’s what I’m doing.

Can you pinpoint a moment or a piece of art that initially inspired you?
There isn’t anything specific – though when something grabs my attention or causes me to stop in my tracks without me necessarily realising, those are the kind of things that can spark some type of inspiration.

What do you think is the overriding influence on your filmmaking: other art, emotions, current affairs – or a mixture of all of these?
All those things, really, in different doses. But the main influence on my filmmaking is me: my own imagination mixed with how I’m feeling with regards to different things from various points within my life.

If you could show at any film festival or win any award in the future, which would it be?
Every one. At the highest level. First with a high-end short, then features.

“When something grabs my attention or causes me to stop in my tracks without me necessarily realising, those are the kind of things that can spark some type of inspiration”

Do you have a favourite venue you’ve shown in? If so, what makes it special?
I’ve missed most of the international screenings where The Desolate One has been shown due to commitments and priorities to do with my next project, The Neolith. But the first time I saw The Desolate One on a large cinema screen sticks out. It was local, on the biggest screen in Picturehouse at FACT. It was just me, the film’s DOP and sound designer checking a few technical things. I remember they sat down to watch it and I stayed standing the whole time. Also, when it was screened publicly at the same place several months later that was cool. I had a big crowd turn up making lots of noise so it was pretty memorable.

Why is filmmaking important to you?
It feels authentic to me when I’m doing it. Particularly when it’s my own project out in the open. When you see it come to life from a thought in your mind, to paper, then a screen then with people in front of a camera, there is a clarity to that kind of stuff I don’t have with other things. It feels correct to be going in that direction.

Can you recommend a movie, director or cinematographer that Bido Lito! readers might not be familiar with?
Yeh, me, Daniel Boocock. If you’re not familiar now you will be soon enough. I’m just getting warmed up, ha!

claretandbluefilm.com

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